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  Bangkok, Thailand– So you’ve finally arrived. You’re in Thailand! Pristine beaches and azure waters are a stone’s throw away. Before you go into the city, however, you must visit the Bang Pa-In Royal Palace, situated beside the Chao Phraya river. Now that you’re here, there are a million things to do, starting from Bangkok itself (ahem, export surplus much?). Many would go ahead and start the shopping but you should probably keep that for the end of the vacation so that you don’t have to lug around heaping bags of clothes, shoes and other stuff.  

  Yangon– Even though Myanmar’s capital shifted to Naypyidaw a decade ago, Yangon remains the busiest and most happening city in the country. The Shwedagon Pagoda, a huge, gilded stupa and a very important landmark, dominates the Yangon skyline. It is as crowded and bustling as Naypyidaw is empty. Head to the Bogyoke Aug San Market where you’ll find every possible Burmese souvenir and handicraft under the sun, from lacquerware to Shan shoulder bags.  

  Naypyidaw– The current capital of Myanmar, Naypyidaw is as big as it is bizarre. Wide, 20-lane highways are flanked by residential buildings, office spaces and sweeping holidays villas. Despite it being six times the size of New York City and having the capacity to accommodate 1 million people, Naypyidaw is a ghost city. You barely see people around. Many wonder at the mysteries Myanmar’s latest capital is shrouded in. So just check around for signs of life and visit the massive Uppatasanti Pagoda which houses a Buddha tooth relic from China.  

  Mandalay– Okay, it may not be the most peaceful place in the world. But Mandalay, the last royal capital of Myanmar and its second largest city, is worth exploring because of its ornate monasteries, striking temples and graceful churches. Sojourn for a bit of peaceful meditation at the Shwe In Bin Kyaung, a traditional teak monastery that was built by Chinese jade merchants in 1895.  

  Bagan– With its numerous beautiful temples and pagodas, the ancient city of Bagan is a definite stop over on your journey. The Bagan plains are one of the main draws in Myanmar tourism and no wonder why. You will feel like you’ve stepped into a different age, traversing the vast network of bumpy dirt roads and trails that connect the 2200 or so temples.  

  Shillong– “The Abode of Clouds” is a pretty place that is, as the name suggests, right up among the clouds. Rolling green hills and towering waterfalls are combined with the ever growing sprawl of urban residences and offices. Having been occupied by European settlers though, this city (also called the Scotland of the East) too has colonial charm in its arsenal.  

  Guwahati– The city is a gateway to the North-east and is usually ignored in travel itineraries to this part of the country. However, exploring the old quarters, with the colonial-era mansions and small, single-storied traditional houses, is an unexpected treat. The local life is best enjoyed in these areas.  

  Lucknow– Biryani! Does anything else need to be said? Lucknow is one city that is bursting with culture and history and wonderful culinary diversity. Majestic imambaras meet British Raj-era buildings here. Be sure to visit the Hazratganj shopping area where you’ll find traditional bazaars AND malls. Lucknow is nothing if not colourful.  

  Agra– For obvious reasons. Whether you’re a history buff or an admirer of art and architecture, Agra, combining the medieval and the modern, is a must visit. Driving through its lanes will take you past massive fortresses and apartment complexes, sprawling gardens and resorts. The city is especially beautiful in November. And no trip to Agra is complete without a visit to the magnificent Taj Mahal.​  

The highway is going to take you through some amazing places and the time on the road is going to be filled with adventure and incredible experiences. No worrying about deadlines. Just driving leisurely down sun-kissed routes, with the wind in your hair and new destinations ahead of you. Starting from New Delhi, there are going to be so many pit stops on your route.

THE  JOURNEY 

Take Your Passport Along on this Road Trip

keep your windows down without being blasted in the face by hot air.The Trilateral Highway covers a distance of 3200 km, starting from Moreh in India and ending at Mae Sot in Thailand.

 Visa Requirements

  Thailand is a visa on arrival country for Indians. So you will be required to have your passport, visa application form, two colour photographs (35mm x 45 mm), your bank statement and original currency exchange slips (for Thailand). You need not worry about carrying a lot of Myanmar Kyat as quite a few ATMs have now opened up in the country and if you have your Visa or your MasterCard, you can pass through easily while crossing borders.​  

 Driving Permits

  ​​​I​f you go to to Thailand on a holiday, you will not require a Thai driving license. Your Indian license will suffice. But having an International Driving Permit (IDP) is always better as you are less likely to be hassled by authority on the road. Remember to carry along both, your Indian license and your IDP. If you are renting a car or a motorbike, ensure that you have the rental agreement forms as proof of ownership of the vehicle.​You can go on a road trip whenever your heart desires. That’s the beauty of it. But keeping in mind the length of the journey, November to March is the best period to head out. The weather remains pleasant during these months and you can hit the road and

 ​You can go on a road trip whenever your heart desires. That’s the beauty of it. But keeping in mind the length of the journey, November to March is the best period to head out. The weather remains pleasant during these months and you can hit the road and keep your windows down without being blasted in the face by hot air.The Trilateral Highway covers a distance of 3200 km, starting from Moreh in India and ending at Mae Sot in Thailand. 

When To Do It?

The Road Ends at the Little Hamlet of Mae Sot in Thailand

Keep your schedule flexible and you will encounter a lot of wonderful things on the way. After all, a road trip is all about letting your hair down and going where the path takes you. And you will definitely enjoy every moment of THIS journey – we’ll get you to Thailand sometime really soon.

The Trilateral Highway covers a distance of 3200 km, starting from Moreh in India and ending at Mae Sot in Thailand.

How Long Is The Journey?

The highway essentially begins from Moreh, a border town situated in Manipur. Once you leave Moreh, you’re into Myanmar and your international holiday starts.

So Where Does It Start?

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es, you heard that right. You can now take a road trip to everyone’s favourite Asian holiday destination- Thailand. Made possible by the construction of the Trilateral Highway, a 3200 km stretch which is set for completion by 2016, this is one of those “things you must try at least once in your life”. The road is a connector 

between India, Myanmar and Thailand and all the magic of these three countries will remain at your disposal as you drive down to the Land of Smiles. So pack your beachwear and sunscreen and go on the ultimate road trip to Thailand.

The Ultimate Road Trip: 
Driving from 
INDIA to THAILAND